Curacao–A Gem in the Caribbean

Guest Post
Already dreading winter’s chill? Check out today’s guest post for a warm place to thaw.

Curacao—A Gem in the Caribbean
by Sally Jadlow

cruise-shipA cruise is so fun because the captain takes you places you can only get to on a ship. Our family took a winter cruise aboard a Royal Caribbean liner from Port Canaveral, Florida.
pulling-into-port-2
We visited many islands, but the most unique was Curacao, (pronounced Cur-a-sow) a Kingdom of the Netherlands. It’s located forty miles off the north coast of Venezuela. Our ship pulled into the deep harbor at the capital of Willemstad.

During the 1500s, the Netherlands achieved independence from Spain and the Dutch began to occupy the island. They built forts around the island for protection from pirates.
view-from-the-fort-to-the-floating-walkway

In 1662 the Dutch West India Company made Curacao a center for the Atlantic slave trade for other Caribbean islands as well as South America.
rif-fort
Today, it is a popular destination for cruise ships.

Colorful shops illustrative of Dutch architecture attract visitors from all over the world.
colorful-shopsA twenty-foot wide walking bridge swings open on the water to allow ships to pass into the harbor. It operates at the whim of those who lounge in the control shack on one end of the bridge.
bridge-openingOn both sides of the mouth of the harbor, sits an ancient rock fortress. Today, you can sit in the open air of the fort and enjoy a cool drink or a delicious meal.
inside-the-fortThe beautiful Renaissance Curacao Resort and Casino opened which is nestled beside the harbor fort with a lovely swimming pool at the edge of the ocean.
pulling-into-portAll too soon it was time to board the ship again and swing farther into the southern Caribbean headed for another island.
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Sally Jadlow writes historical fiction, short stories, poetry, and devotions.
Her newest book is Hard Times in the Heartland–historical fiction
based on her father’s letters covering the Depression and WW II.

Her website is SallyJadlow.com.
Her Amazon Author Page is here.
Sally’s blogs are https://godslittlemiraclebook.wordpress.com,
FamilyFavoritesFromTheHeartland.wordpress.com, and
HardTimesInTheHeartland.wordpress.com

Check out her Facebook at Sally Jadlow Author
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Thank you, Sally. I love your photographs. It’s easy to tell the Dutch origins of this settlement. The architecture gives it away.

Those beautiful pastel buildings have me wondering. Why don’t we paint our homes in such lovely hues? Why are we stuck with such limited palettes of drab beige and taupe? Where’s our imagination?

Travel Tips & Very Light Humor
If you hate crowds as much as I do, here’s a tip. The time when the least number of cruise ships are at their ports of call will be the least crowded time to go on a cruise.

I know. Simple. Right?

Don’t laugh too hard. I know it’s obvious.

However, here’s something that may not seem as obvious. Call the cruise lines and ask for their least crowded cruises. It’s not a secret. They will tell you. Often the end of season is the least crowded, but the ships still need passengers.

They have to sail, so they may give you a discount otherwise known as a promotional fare. That’s code for a sale.

So, if you find the sale to fit your wallet, you just might sail.

Okay, I’m done.

Tell us about your favorite island. Sally and I would love to hear your opinions. Or tell us what color you think is best for house paint.

Until next time…Travel Light,
SuZan
© 2016 SuZan Klassen


2 thoughts on “Curacao–A Gem in the Caribbean

    1. Sounds good to pick and choose the island you want to stay at. Some cruises only stay for short periods at some of these islands. If you want to spend a few days on a particular island, you should double-check the ship’s itinerary for a cruise that allows that experience.

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