Mission to the Moon

This summer marked the 50th Anniversary of the first landing on the moon.

With all the hoopla over this space anniversary, I decided the best way to celebrate was to watch a movie. Apollo 13 seemed the obvious choice. I requested a copy from my library. Unfortunately so did many others. I’m still waiting my turn to view it.

“What?” you ask. “Why don’t you just buy your own copy? Or download it?”

No thank you. It’s more fun to wait my turn. You never know what opportunities will occur in the waiting room.

Waiting Room
While I waited I checked out
The Real Story, Apollo 13 a documentary by the Smithsonian Channel. The documentary intrigued me. Did the movie get it right? What was reality? What was Hollywood?

The documentary proposed and answered several of the questions I had. I won’t spoil all of them. Hopefully you’ll view it yourself.

But there were two questions that intrigued me more than others—probably because if it was true—the lives of the astronauts hung on the answers: Did they really adapt an air filter with duct tape? And did that contraption really save their lives?

The documentary explained they basically had to make a square peg fit into a round hole. They did indeed make that filter out of items onboard the spacecraft: a plastic bag, cardboard, and tape. The item is demonstrated for the camera. Without the adaptation the astronauts would have run out of safe oxygen.

The story of Apollo 13—the story of rescue and survival—is the story of three guys who didn’t get to realize their dream. So why is it so intriguing to many of us?

Even though I’ve seen the Hollywood version of the story previously (Apollo 13, the movie), there’s just something about seeing it again. Maybe it’s the rescue. Maybe it’s the survival. Maybe it’s what might have been.

I just checked my account on the library’s website. It seems my turn to view the Apollo 13 DVD has finally arrived. But I do not regret waiting my turn. My time was well spent.

Travel Tips
• Library
Utilize your local library. Don’t be too upset if you have to wait a little while for an item.
You might find a surprising gem in the meantime.
• Space Travel
Not surprisingly, I don’t have many travel tips for this one. I do not anticipate traveling in a spacecraft any time soon, to the moon or otherwise.
However, here is one thought . . .

Perspective
If future travel plans don’t work out—for you or for us—maybe we should all keep it in perspective.

No matter how disastrous our travel plans have been, we’ve never had our mission to the moon aborted.

Until next time . . . Travel Light,
SuZan
© 2019 SuZan Klassen


4 thoughts on “Mission to the Moon

  1. Susan I really enjoy your posts. I never tell you enough how they help me. The square peg in a round hole has been told to me so many times since my childhood memories had and still come to light. I am a square peg in a round hole sociaty. Yet I’m still here! Whatever tools God provides me I’m still working on it. I refuse to give up just like the astronauts did not give up. Apollo 13 sends a message of failure is not an option. They showed us courage, thinking outside the box, determination plus how you think you are on a mission and beyond your control you are actually on a different mission. You learn to accept change, fighting to save your original mission is a waste of time to the point of doom. You must accept where you are now and ask God for wisdom, knowledge and a clear mind to be able to focus on your current situation to stay alive and complete your mission without judging, shaming or self destruction. Whether we like it or not, life is not a straight path without major problems to overcome. It’s how we respond and survive, asking for help from God and friends and finding solutions in difficult circumstances. Then getting up and keep walking staying on the narrow path of light.

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